‘No room to hide’: Republican congressman to face impeachment trial

Minnesota Rep. Kevin Brady (R) faces an impeachment trial on Monday for alleged violations of House ethics rules.

Brady faces a charge of misusing House resources.

If convicted, Brady faces up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

He is the second lawmaker to be charged with such a crime in the last month.

Brady, the top Democrat on the House Ways and Means Committee, resigned from Congress earlier this year amid revelations that he had sent texts and photos of a woman to a close aide.

He resigned the following week and later told reporters he was taking a leave of absence.

A House Ethics Committee investigation of the matter concluded that Brady’s office had engaged in a pattern of inappropriate and unethical conduct, but not that of any member of Congress.

He will also be on trial for alleged misuse of taxpayer funds.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D) said Monday that Brady was “not a representative of the people of Minnesota.”

She said Brady had been the subject of a House investigation and that he is “not fit to serve.”

Brady did not immediately respond to a request for comment. 

“No room for hiding,” Pelosi said on Twitter.

“No room is too small for Kevin Brady to represent the people.” 

Brady’s case is the latest high-profile corruption case to be brought against a Minnesota representative.

Last month, House Minority Leader Tom Bakk (R-Minn.) was charged with using his office to help pay for sex acts.

The charges were dismissed by a judge, who found Bakk did not have “any direct or indirect interest” in the alleged acts. 

Bakk was accused of using a campaign account to pay for a sexual encounter with a lobbyist in 2015, a matter that was never reported to the Ethics Committee.

The complaint said that Bakk was a co-sponsor of the bill that would allow lawmakers to use their official vehicles to have sexual encounters with lobbyists. 

Earlier this year, Rep. Joe Stork (D-Iowa) was charged for allegedly paying a lobbyist for sex, though he was never charged with a crime. 

Democrats have been particularly vocal about their calls for Brady to resign over his alleged misuse and abuse of taxpayer dollars, but they have yet to publicly call for the House Ethics Panel to recommend his impeachment.

Brady’s alleged misdeeds are the latest to plague the Minnesota lawmaker, who was first elected to Congress in 2007. 

His current term expires at the end of the month.