Why does the union of public schools in Ohio say the nude-in-public policy is unconstitutional?

A public school district in Ohio has declared a policy that forbids naked-in a public place, but the union representing teachers and administrators in that district is arguing it’s unconstitutional.

Union members at the City of Cleveland Public Schools voted overwhelmingly to adopt the policy Wednesday, and it will go into effect on July 1.

The vote came on the heels of a similar policy in North Carolina that was struck down in November.

The North Carolina law required teachers to wear pants or masks and said nude-looking people, such as students or staff, are not allowed in school buildings.

The district argued that it’s a matter of free speech and free expression.

The North Carolina policy sparked national controversy.

The Associated Press reported that one man was arrested after he wore a “Nude in Public” T-shirt at a protest against the policy.

The Ohio policy, which goes into effect July 1, allows school districts to opt out of the rule by a simple majority vote.

The majority of those districts that opt out will not be required to follow the new policy.

It was unclear Wednesday if the city’s board of education would take up the issue at a board meeting next month.